Thousands of new OBD2 Trouble Codes added!

OBD2 Trouble Codes or Diagnostic Trouble Codes are defined by SAE (Society of Automobile Engineers). SAE is the organization that specifies the OBD2 standards. These include the one that defines all the generic Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). Car manufacturers follow these definitions when they assign DTCs for detected errors.

New DTCs

J2012 is the document that defines the OBD2 Trouble Codes. The standard hasn’t been updated for a while but few months ago it got a new revision. The newest revision contained a bunch of new DTCs. These DTCs take new technology such as hybrid vehicles into better consideration, for example.

OBD Auto Doctor contains now all the possible generic OBD2 Trouble Codes that exists. We added total of 3899 new DTCs to the software.

The software contains total of 18193 Trouble Codes. The latest PC & Mac software as well as the Android and iOS apps have all these codes included.

The codes include:

  • Powertrain: 6631 codes
  • Network & Vehicle Integration: 1017 codes
  • Chassis: 363 codes
  • Body: 165 codes
  • Rest of the codes are manufacturer specific trouble codes

Multiple Freeze Frames

The latest desktop software version added support for multiple Freeze Frames too. Typically, only one freeze frame is saved. But with newer cars, it’s possible to store multiple freeze frames; one for each trouble code. The software will now read all available frames.

This is a great addition if the vehicle has more than one issue present. You get details from each issue, not only the first one.





New Bluetooth Low Energy OBD2 dongles

We are glad to announce that OBD Auto Doctor supports now two new Bluetooth Low Energy OBD2 dongles. These are Carista and Vgate. This is especially great news for iPhone users. Because, for technical reasons, iPhones don’t support traditional Bluetooth dongles at all. Now, the latest iPhone app added support for these two new dongles. The app supported already the Kiwi 3 before. iPhone users have now three different Bluetooth dongles to pick from.

Carista and Vgate both have a chip containing support for both traditional Bluetooth as well as Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). This is nice if you want to use the same dongle with your computer too. Not all computers have support for BLE but instead they have traditional Bluetooth. In this case, your computer too can communicate with the dongle. No need for hardware upgrade.

Carista

Carista dongle is a reliable and safe adapter. The dongle has solid quality and small form factor.

Our iPhone app communicates with the dongle using Bluetooth Low Energy. Other OBD Auto Doctor software products use basic Bluetooth connection with it.

Carista dongle

Vgate

Vgate is a small and performing dongle. Vgate has several BLE products that we support. These include iCar Pro, iCar2 and iCar1 among others.

Remember to pick the Bluetooth Low Energy version if you need the iOS support. Other OBD Auto Doctor software uses the normal Bluetooth connection with it. Just like with Carista.

Carista dongle

Where to get them?

We have listed these new and some other compatible dongles in the OBD Adapters & Dongles page. There you will find links to some stores that sell these dongles.





How to read and reset the Check Engine Light?

Check Engine Light

The Check Engine Light indicates that there is a problem with the car. Either the engine is having a problem or the emission control system has detected an issue. This malfunction is indicated by triggering the Check Engine Light (CEL).

The indicator light is sometimes also referred as Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL). This warning light is the main indicator to warn you about problems with the vehicle. Ignoring the warning can cause serious damage to the car.

There is always at least one OBD2 diagnostic trouble code associated with the check engine light. When the vehicle detects an issue, it will set an active trouble code and trigger the CEL. This tutorial will show you how to read the diagnostic trouble codes and reset the Check Engine Light yourself.


Read the Diagnostic Trouble Codes

Reading the diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) is an important step to start with. The DTCs will tell you the reason for the fault. The codes help you identify the issue and determine the cause. Reading the codes is easy.

Prepare the vehicle for connection

  • Locate the OBD-II diagnostic connector in your car. Search for 16-pin D-shaped connector that will match the adapter. The connector should be located close to the steering wheel. Typical place for the socket is the compartment under the driver’s side dashboard.

  • Connect the OBD2 dongle to the connector. Make sure the adapter is tightly attached but don’t use too much force.

  • Turn ignition key to the ON position. Don’t start the engine because to reset the light, the engine shouldn’t be running. If the dongle has some LEDs, they should start blinking. If the dongle has on/off switch, make sure it is turned on.

Use OBD software to read the codes

Now, launch the OBD Auto Doctor car diagnostic software and connect to the dongle. The connection procedure is a bit different depending on the platform you are using. It also depends on the connection method (Bluetooth, WiFi or USB). Refer to the connection instructions of the platform and dongle.

If you are using the desktop version (PC, Mac or Linux), continue with the step A. Otherwise, proceed to the step B for mobile app (Android or iOS) usage.

A. Read the DTCs with the desktop software
  • To read the DTCs with the desktop software, navigate to Trouble Codes from the left navigation panel. The software will read and show the information.
  • Change the tab in the top to switch the view between confirmed, pending and permanent DTCs and freeze frame.


Trouble Codes view on Windows
Trouble Codes view on Windows. Confirmed DTCs tab active.


  • You can also export all the codes and the freeze frame to a text file to keep history of events. While in the Trouble Codes view, click Export and save the file to your computer.


B. Read the DTCs with the mobile app
  • Reading the DTCs is very simple with the mobile app, just navigate to Trouble Codes tab. The app will fetch the information for you.
  • To get detailed information, navigate to Diagnostic Trouble Codes and/or Freeze Frame


General Trouble Codes view on iPhone
General Trouble Codes view on iPhone
Detailed Diagnostic Trouble Codes view on iPhone
Detailed Diagnostic Trouble Codes view


  • You can also export all the codes and the freeze frame. While in the Trouble Codes tab, tap the share button from the top header and select the preferred method. This way you can save the diagnostic information for later analysis.



Reset the Check Engine Light

Most of the time the diagnostic trouble codes appear for a good reason. You should investigate the codes and fix the issues causing the errors. Only after fixing, you should proceed to resetting the check engine light. If you haven’t fixed the issues, the same codes might come back immediately.

However, sometimes the error codes occur from a random failure and there’s nothing to fix. In this case, you can reset the check engine light and hope the issue doesn’t come back. If it wasn’t just a random failure, the error returns. Yet, you should ensure that there are no problems with the car every time before doing the reset.

Clear diagnostic information

Resetting the check engine light will clear the diagnostic trouble codes too. It will also clear all other diagnostic information such as stored freeze frame data and status of test results. After the reset, the car may run poorly while it performs re-calibration.

One important thing to note is that resetting the CEL will reset the readiness monitors. This means that your car will not pass emissions inspection immediately after the reset. Because the emissions data is deleted, the smog device will fail your car. Read more about the emissions or readiness monitors and how to get them ready from this tutorial.

After you have read the DTCs, you can continue to clearing the codes and the warning light. Depending whether you are using the desktop software or the mobile app, continue to either step A or step B accordingly.

A. Use Windows, Mac or Linux to reset the Check Engine Light

To reset the Check Engine Light with your computer:

  • Click the Clear the DTCs button in the Trouble Codes view. Read and acknowledge the information presented.

Now, the reset command is send to the car and the light is cleared. To see illustration of the process, check the short animation below.


Reset Check Engine Light with PC or Mac
How to reset Check Engine Light with Windows, Mac or Linux


B. Use Android or iPhone to reset the Check Engine Light

To reset the Check Engine Light with your mobile device:

  • Tap the Reset trouble codes and MIL button. Read and acknowledge the information presented.

Now, the reset command is send to the car and the light is cleared. To see short illustration of the process, check the animation below.


Reset Check Engine Light with Android
How to reset Check Engine Light with Android


Summary

Resetting the Check Engine Light is very easy process. More work is required for analysing the root cause of the warning and fixing the possible issues. Luckily, the car itself helps you get started. It provides the Diagnostic Trouble Codes and other diagnostic information about the problem.

Avoid expensive dealer visits by reading the codes and resetting the warning light yourself. It’s a good idea to get the software and dongle right now. Waiting for the actual issues to appear might be too late. Getting yourself familiar with the tools when everything is working fine is a great start.


Avoid battery reset

Resetting the DTCs is sometimes also possible by disconnecting the battery for awhile. We do not recommend this method. New vehicles can have systems that need constant battery voltage. Disconnecting the battery can cause new issues with these systems. For example, the car theft system or infotainment system might be reset. Resetting the DTCs with a OBD tool is the recommend way. That's how the professional mechanics do it and you should too.





OBD car app redesigned for Android

Our OBD car app for Android has been a great success this far. Over 600,000 installations and over 1,100 five star reviews prove this success. As the Android platform continues to improve itself, we keep improving the app as well. Just before Christmas we released new and improved OBD Auto Doctor car app.

App navigation

The previous app version used side navigation as the navigation pattern. This was the recommended way to provide navigation in Android for a long time. It had some problems, though. Some users didn’t learn how to use the navigation and didn’t understand it’s usage. For the new version we redesigned the app navigation. We replaced the old navigation with much simpler and intuitive tab bar navigation. It’s now also one of the official navigation paradigms for Android. It makes the navigation faster because all the main sections are visible at the bottom of the screen.

It wasn’t always easy to find the menu option for resetting the check engine light. Different devices had different ways of opening the menus. Some devices had a physical button and some had an user interface element for opening the menu. Now, the reset button is always visible in the Trouble Codes view. You can’t miss it anymore.


Digital dashboard
Digital dashboard / Status view with tab bar navigation


Digital Dashboard

As one of the new features, we replaced the old analog dashboard with with a digital one. The digital dashboard or so called status view of the app is now the starting view. With this view you can track the sensors you want in real-time and with large and easy to read fonts. The speed and RPM are the only fixed sensors in the screen. You can customise all other sensors. Long press any “sensor box” to replace a sensor with any sensor that your car supports.

On-Board Diagnostic Monitors (OBD Mode $06)

Another new feature that we added was the support for On-Board Diagnostic Monitors. These monitors are also know as the OBD mode 06. On-Board Diagnostic Monitors offer professional level diagnostic capabilities. These monitors can give detailed information about misfire counts, for example. They can also give reasons for readiness monitor failures or hints for emerging problems. Not all cars support this mode but luckily most cars do.

Read more: Using OBD2 mode $06 for car diagnostics.


OBD2 mode 06
On-Board diagnostic monitors


Localisations and more

OBD Auto Doctor has users all over the world. We’ve analysed the most popular countries and the need for app localisation. As a result, we translated the app user interface to French, German, Russian and Finnish.

The new design and improvements were loved among the first users:

Love it – Great UI and very responsive. Tons of information.

What do you think? Download or update the car app from Google Play.

Then drop us an email or add comment below about how you find the new app. Thanks for your support!





Bluetooth Low Energy update for Mac and PC

Our OBD diagnostic software for macOS, Windows and Linux got new version update yesterday. Along other changes, the version 3.1 includes important improvements for Bluetooth connectivity.

OBD Auto Doctor mobile apps have included support for Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) dongles already. Now, we are happy to provide the support on all supported platforms. This includes support on Windows, Mac OS X / macOS and Linux. The selected BLE dongles work now with OBD Auto Doctor regardless the computer or phone you use.

BLE support on Windows

Windows 8 is the first Windows version to support Bluetooth LE. This means that you need to have Windows 8 or newer to take advantage of the new feature.


Windows 10 Bluetooth LE settings
Pairing the dongle in Windows 10


Before OBD Auto Doctor can connect to the BLE dongle, you need to pair the dongle in the system settings. In Windows 10, you can find Bluetooth settings by ‘Settings’ -> ‘Devices’ -> ‘Bluetooth’. Make sure you have paired the dongle successfully before launching OBD Auto Doctor. OBD Auto Doctor will now find the device and take care of the rest.

BLE support on Mac OS X

OBD Auto Doctor can use Bluetooth LE on all supported OS X versions. Remember to check that your Mac has Bluetooth 4.0 hardware included. Macs started to have the hardware around 2011-2012. No pairing or other manual actions are required outside of the software to use these dongles.

BLE support on Linux

Bluez is the library in Linux that provides Bluetooth support. You need to have version of Bluez that has the support included. Check your distribution for more details.

Scanning BLE devices needs special rights. You can use superuser or root for that. Or you can give the application the needed permissions just once:

sudo setcap cap_net_raw,cap_net_admin=eip /usr/bin/obdautodoctor

After running the previous command, you can run obdautodoctor as normal user. Notice that some Linux distros require that you need to be part of the dialout group to able to use Bluetooth. To add an user to the group, issue:

sudo adduser username dialout

If you install the software using the .deb package, these actions will be taken care of automatically for you.

Get the update

You can download the latest version from the download page.

The list of supported BLE dongles can be found from here.

To utilise BLE dongle, you need to have a compatible computer with Bluetooth 4.0 hardware. If you have any questions or concerns, just leave a comment below.